Getting More out of Seamless Tiles

tiles_header_smallI wrote an article for Dev.Mag covering some techniques for working with seamless tile sets such as making blend tiles, getting more variety with procedural colour  manipulation, tile placement strategies, and so on. 

Check it out!

The Python Image Code has also been updated with some of the algorithms explained in the article.

Cellular Automata for Simulation in Games

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A cellular automata system is one of the best demonstrations of emergence. If you do not know what cellular automata (CA) is, then you should go download Conway’s Game of Life immediately:

Conway’s Game of Life

Essentially, CA is a collection of state machines, updated in discrete time intervals. The next state of one of these depends on the current state as well as the states of neighbours. Usually, the state machines correspond to cells in a grid, and the neighbours of a cell are the cells connected to that cell. For a more detailed explanation, see the Wikipedia article.

Even simple update rules can lead to interesting behaviour: patterns that cannot be predicted from the rules except by running them. With suitable rules, CA can simulate many systems:

  • Natural phenomena: weather, fire, plant growth, migration patterns, spread of disease.
  • Socio-economic phenomena: urbanisation, segregation, construction and property development, traffic, spread of news.

Continue reading “Cellular Automata for Simulation in Games”

About Me

ht1_smallI am Herman Tulleken.

I have an honors degree in computer engineering, and I have been making games professionally since 2006, working for Luma Arcade, InnovationLab, I-Imagine and ICE and for many others as a freelancer. In 2013 I partnered with friend / colleague Jonathan Bailey to start a new game-tools business Gamelogic. In 2015 we started a community of game developers in Chile, which became GameDev Planet in 2016.

I have written on many game development and related topics (on Gamasutra and others). You can get a full list on my Writing page.

On occasion I also compose the odd piece of music, mostly for piano.

Email: herman.tulleken@gmail.com

View Herman Tulleken's profile on LinkedIn

 

 

Python Image Code

I use this code to illustrate many of the tutorials on this site, and the articles I write for Dev.Mag. Ideally, I would like to package the code so that it is the minimal necessary for the particular tutorial; however, a lot of the code is reused, so that it becomes difficult to maintain. Instead, I distribute it all together. That way, new updates and extensions can be found in one place.

The current version includes classes and functions for:

  • easy-syntax 2D and 3D arrays (for example, you can use grid[1:20:2, 2:3:20] to access the pixels in every second column (starting with column 1 and ending before column 20) and every third row (starting from row 2 and ending before row 20) (docs);
  • general image utility function (docs);
  • perlin noise (docs, tutorial);
  • poisson-disk sampling (docs, tutorial);
  • texture generation algorithms (docs, tutorial);
  • quadtrees (docs, tutorial part1 and part 2);
  • classes for generating random points (1D and 2D) from arbitrary distributions (docs, tutorial);
  • functions for blending between images (for smooth transitions between regions in seamless tile sets) [see blend_demo.py, tutorial];  and
  • functions for image quilting (under construction).
A few notes:
  • The code is not optimised, and in general convenience and clarity takes precedence over speed. This code is not suitable for many applications where speed is important.
  • The code will change often. At this stage I do not try to make it backwards compatible.

Download

Python Image Code v0.6

python_image_code_v0_6.zip (593 KB)

Requires PIL (Python Image Library).

This version includes some of the dependencies that accidentally got left behind in the previous version.

60 Ways to make Game Maker projects more maintainable

Game Maker is a great tool; it is especially suited for rapid development and small projects. However, as a project becomes bigger, it becomes more difficult to find things, easier to break it, and generally harder to work on. This is of course true for any production environment, and there are many things you can do to tame the beast of scale. Here are 60 things to make Game Maker projects more maintainable.

Continue reading “60 Ways to make Game Maker projects more maintainable”