Tips for Designing and Implementing a Stimulus Response Agent

brain
(Original Image by everyone’s idle.)

This post was a originally published on Luma Labs, now dead.

As old as stimulus-response techniques are, they still form an important part of many AI systems, even if it is a thin layer underneath a sophisticated decision, planning, or learning system. In this tutorial I give some advice to their design and implementation, mostly out of experience gained from implementing the AI for some racing games.

A stimulus response agent (or a reactive agent) is an agent that takes inputs from its world through sensors, and then takes action based on those inputs through actuators. Between the stimulus and response, there is a processing unit that can be arbitrarily complex. An example of such an agent is one that controls a vehicle in a racing game: the agent “looks” at the road and nearby vehicles, and then decides how much to turn and break.

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Random Steering – 7 Components for a Toolkit

Random steering is often a useful for simulating interesting steering motion. In this post we look at components that make up a random steering toolkit. These can be combined in various ways to get agents to move in interesting ways.

You might want to have a look at Craig Reynolds’ Steering Behaviour for Autonomous Characters — the wander behaviour is what is essentially covered in this tutorial. The main difference is that we control the angle of movement directly, while Reynolds produce a steering force. This post only look at steering — we assume the forward speed is constant. All references to velocity or acceleration refers to angular velocity and angular acceleration.

Whenever I say “a random number”, I mean a uniformly distributed random floating point value between 0 and 1.

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