Simple, Fast* Approximate Minimum / Maximum Filters

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*Fast = not toooo slow…

For the image restoration tool I had to implement min and max filters (also erosion and dilation—in this case with a square structuring element). Implementing these efficiently is not so easy. The naive approach is to simply check all the pixels in the window, and select the maximum or minimum value. This algorithm’s run time is quadratic in the window width, which can be a bit slow for the bigger windows that I am interested in. There are some very efficient algorithms available, but they are quite complicated to implement properly (some require esoteric data structures, for example monotonic wedges (PDF)), and many are not suitable for floating point images.

So I came up with this approximation scheme. It uses some expensive floating point operations, but its run time is constant in the window width.

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Experimental Tool for Removing Unwanted Artefacts in Textures

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Many textures used for 3D art start from photographs. Ideally, such textures should be uniformly lit so that the texture does not interfere with the lighting applied by the 3D software. Often, lighting artefacts must be removed by hand. This can be tedious and time consuming.

The tool provided here aims to automate this process. It is still in an experimental phase, so it is very crude. Below you can see some of the before and after pictures.

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Tips for Designing and Implementing a Stimulus Response Agent

brain
(Original Image by everyone’s idle.)

This post was a originally published on Luma Labs, now dead.

As old as stimulus-response techniques are, they still form an important part of many AI systems, even if it is a thin layer underneath a sophisticated decision, planning, or learning system. In this tutorial I give some advice to their design and implementation, mostly out of experience gained from implementing the AI for some racing games.

A stimulus response agent (or a reactive agent) is an agent that takes inputs from its world through sensors, and then takes action based on those inputs through actuators. Between the stimulus and response, there is a processing unit that can be arbitrarily complex. An example of such an agent is one that controls a vehicle in a racing game: the agent “looks” at the road and nearby vehicles, and then decides how much to turn and break.

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